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Model Rocketeer, National Association of Rocketry
April 1968 American Aircraft Modeler

April 1968 American Aircraft Modeler

April 1968 American Aircraft Modeler Table of Contents

These pages from vintage modeling magazines like Flying Aces, Air Trails, American Modeler, American Aircraft Modeler, Young Men, Flying Models, Model Airplane News, R/C Modeler, captured the era. All copyrights acknowledged.

Join the National Association of Rocketry - Airplanes and RocketsThe National Association of Rocketry (NAR) has been around since 1957. At one time, the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) was pretty tightly joined with them in covering model rocketry events and promoting model rocketry. In fact, for while there was space allotted in American Aircraft Modeler, AMA's monthly magazine, for model rocketry. From February 1968 through August 1969 there was a newsletter feature entitled "Model Rocketeer" in addition to a separate article, often written by G. Harry Stine. A complete list of all editions is provided below.

Sport Rocketry, Part 1, October 2006 - Airplanes and RocketsThe NAR and AMA still work together. For example, the National Aeronautic Association (NAA) delegates authority for aeromodeling and spacemodeling to the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA), who has in turn delegated Spacemodeling (model rocketry) to the NAR.

Click the NAR logo to the left and go to the membership page of today's National Association of Rocketry. You can read a sample edition of the NAR's magazine, Sport Rocketry, by clicking the thumbnail image to the right (here is part 2).

 

Model Rocketeer, National Association of Rocketry, April 1968 American Aircraft Modeler - Airplanes and Rockets

(click for larger version)


Page 49 (continued from page 41):

Protection Assoc. The main purpose of Kukowski's appearance was to make the organization aware of the progress being made by the NAR and model rocket manufacturers in reducing the untold number of amateur rocketry accidents in the U. S. and to offer a solution to the dilemma faced by the fire marshals and public safety authorities. The NAR also sought their assistance in developing an acceptable standard for model manufacturers and model rocketeers.

Unknown to the host group was the planned attempt by a western state delegation to introduce a resolution condemning model rocketry and calling for the NFP A to take action against it by an official declaration.

The NAR appearance, without a doubt, prevented a negative report on model rocketry. Rather than condemning model rocketry, a decision was withheld and a resolution was approved that would establish discussions between the NAR and the NFP A Pyrotechnics Committee.

The NFPA invited G. Harry Stine to join the Pyrotechnics Committee and to assist in establishing a guideline for a code concerning model rockets. Two years later a tentative Code for Model Rocketry was passed without dissent by the NFPA national convention. During that time the model rocket manufacturers were kept abreast of the situation and later invited to assist the committee in any changes which would improve the code. More refinement of the code has been in progress and a finalized version of the Code for Model Rocketry will be voted on in May, 1968.

WHAT NOW?

Upon final approval of the Code for Model Rocketry by the NFP A, implementation of the code can follow a number of courses. A number of states automatically adopt all NFP A codes, relying on the NFP A as the final determining factor. Other states must take the code and, through the efforts of the state fire marshal and other interested citizens, have the code legislated. In still other states, citizen groups, with the NFP A code as a guide, must "see the bill through" the state legislature. Where local option is the rule, it must be done on a county or city basis.

SUMMARY

One thing is clear. The efforts of the NAR in this all important problem must be made known to all model rocketeers. The course taken has been criticized, but in a final analysis it has proven to be the only one with foresight. The cooperation of the manufacturers has been outstanding and appreciated. But we must remember one thing. There will be more attempts to restrain model rocketry in the future. The NAR must remain strong and unified so that the progress to date is not eroded.

 

 

 

Posted October 16, 2020

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Kirt Blattenberger, Webmaster - Airplanes and Rockets
Kirt Blattenberger
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Even during the busiest times of my life I have endeavored to maintain some form of model building activity. This site has been created to help me chronicle my journey through a lifelong involvement in model aviation, which all began in Mayo, MD ...

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